At The Himalayas – Notes, Question and Answers Class 8 Wind Chimes

‘At The Himalayas’ by Rabindra Nath Tagore in which an eager to escape the city and embrace the Himalayas, a young boy embarks on a captivating journey with his father, venturing deep into the heart of the Dalhousie Hills. Here, the notes include a summary, glossary and Q./Ans. Click here for Word meanings and explanation.

Summary

The story ‘At the Himalayas’ recounts a trip the narrator takes with his father to the Dalhousie Hills in India. The journey is filled with wonder for the young narrator as they travel by jhampan, witnessing breathtaking scenery and encountering the beauty of nature.

His father plays a significant role in shaping the narrator’s experiences. He allows the narrator freedom to explore the mountains, fostering a sense of independence. He also provides educational experiences, teaching him Sanskrit and astronomy under the clear mountain sky.

The father’s approach to discipline is also noteworthy. He doesn’t force or dictate, but rather allows the narrator to learn through experience. He encourages him to find his own path and develop his own love for truth.

The story also showcases a heartwarming father-son bond. They share meals, stories, and letters from home. The father patiently explains things, encourages curiosity, and even tells funny anecdotes.

Finally, after spending a few months in the mountains, the narrator is sent back home with his father’s attendant. The experience leaves a lasting impression, shaping the narrator’s values and his relationship with his father.

  • They travel by jhampan (palki) and stay in bungalows along the way.
  • The father gives the son lessons in Sanskrit, astronomy, and religion.
  • The son enjoys exploring the mountains freely.
  • The father encourages the son’s independence and allows him to make his own choices, even when they differ from his own views.
  • The son learns valuable lessons about truth, responsibility, and seeing the world with fresh eyes.
  • The story also provides glimpses into their life back home through letters and the father’s anecdotes.
  • Finally, the son returns home with the father’s attendant.

Vocabulary

EnglishHindi
Staged BungalowDak Bungalow (डाक बंगला)
JhampanPalki (पलकी)
TerraceChabutra (चबूतरा)
HermitageAashram (आश्रम)
SageRishi (ऋषि)
MossKaanch (कांच)
ConstellationsNakshatra (नक्षत्र)
DevotionsUpasana (उपासना)
VerandahBaramda (बरामदा)
UpanishadsUpanishad (उपनिषद्)
Sanskrit DeclensionsSanskrit Vibhakti (संस्कृत विभक्ति)
PenanceTapasya (तपस्या)
GobletPiala (प्याला)
FrailtyKamzori (कमजोरी)
Flesh and BloodMaans aur Khoon (मांस और खून)
IndebtedAabhari (आभारी)
Bullock CartBail Gadi (बैलगाड़ी)
WanderGhoomna (घूमना)
PerilKhatra (खतरा)
BrahminBrahmin (ब्राह्मण)
Divine ServicePooja (पूजा)
ImperfectionsKamiyan (कमियाँ)
AttractionAakarshan (आकर्षण)
Disciplinary RodSazaa ki Chat (सजा की छड़ी)
StandardNishana (निशाना)
ConceitGhuroor (घमंड)
SanskritisedSankritikrit (संस्कृतकृत)
SnubDaant (डांट)
AnecdoteKahani (कहानी)
ExquisiteNazuk (नाजुक)
Dacca MuslinDhakai Muslin (ढाकाई मलमल)
EmbroideredKashidakari (कशीदकारी)
BluerNeelama (नीलामा)
SuperintendentsNirmala (निरीक्षक)
AvowedSweekar Kiya (स्वीकार किया)
AttendantSevak (सेवक)

Textbook Exercise Q. & Ans.

Comprehension

  1. Why was it difficult for the writer to pass the last few days at Amritsar?
  2. Why did he say that his ‘eyes had no rest the livelong day’?
  3. What according to him is the first vision?
  4. What did he not look forward to in the mornings?
  5. What does he say about Bakrota?
  6. Why does he call the Deodars, ‘these lordly forest trees’?
  7. Why did he have to find a shortcut to return after the walk with his father?
  8. What was his father’s reaction when the writer wanted to journey along the Grand Trunk Road in a bullock cart?

Answers: (3 Sets of answers are given to help students with their HWs)

  1. The writer found it difficult to pass the last few days in Amritsar because he was so strongly drawn to the beauty of the Himalayas. The “call of the Himalayas” was so powerful that it made the remaining days in Amritsar seem to drag on forever.
  2. The writer said his “eyes had no rest the livelong day” because he was so captivated by the scenery during his journey. He was constantly taking in the beauty of the terraced hillsides, the flowering crops, and the majestic mountains, not wanting to miss a single detail.
  3. According to the writer, the “first vision” refers to the initial experience of something new and exciting. When we encounter something for the first time, our minds are fully engaged and appreciate every aspect of it.
  4. The writer didn’t look forward to the cold baths in the mornings. The water was described as “icy-cold,” and his father wouldn’t allow the servants to warm it up.
  5. The writer describes Bakrota, the place they stayed at, as being located on the highest hilltop. However, it was also bitterly cold there, with winter frosts still lingering on the shady side of the hill even in May.
  6. The writer calls the Deodar trees “lordly” because of their majestic size, towering height, and impressive presence. They are described as giants with huge shadows, creating a sense of awe and grandeur.
  7. The writer had to find a shortcut because his father’s pace during their walks was too fast for him to keep up with. He mentions that even many older people couldn’t keep up with his father’s walking speed.
  8. The writer’s father surprisingly supported his seemingly impractical idea of traveling by bullock cart. He thought it was a “splendid idea” and even shared his own stories of adventurous travels by foot and horseback. He didn’t mention any potential difficulties or dangers associated with the bullock cart journey.
  1. Why was it difficult for the writer to pass the last few days at Amritsar?

Ans. The writer found it difficult to pass the last few days in Amritsar because he was so strongly drawn to the beauty of the Himalayas. The “call of the Himalayas” was so powerful that it made the remaining days in Amritsar seem to drag on forever.

  1. Why did he say that his ‘eyes had no rest the livelong day’?

Ans. The writer said his “eyes had no rest the livelong day” because he was so captivated by the scenery on his journey to the Himalayas. He was constantly taking in the beauty of the terraced hillsides, waterfalls, and the towering Deodar trees.

  1. What according to him is the ‘first vision’?

Ans. According to the writer, the “first vision” refers to seeing something new and impressive for the first time. When we experience something for the first time, we appreciate it fully without thinking about all the similar experiences we might have in the future.

  1. What did he not look forward to in the mornings?

Ans. The writer did not look forward to the cold morning baths in Bakrota. The water was icy cold, and his father wouldn’t allow the servants to warm it for him.

  1. What does he say about Bakrota?

Ans. The writer describes Bakrota as being on the highest hilltop and bitterly cold, even nearing May. The winter frosts hadn’t yet melted on the shady side of the hill.

  1. Why does he call the Deodars, ‘these lordly forest trees’?

Ans. The writer calls the Deodars “these lordly forest trees” because of their immense size, towering shadows, and long lifespan. They are described as giants that have lived for centuries.

  1. Why did he have to find a shortcut to return after the walk with his father?

Ans. The writer had to find a shortcut to return after the walk with his father because his father’s pace was too fast for him to keep up with. He mentions that even many older people couldn’t keep up with his father’s walking pace.

  1. What was his father’s reaction when the writer wanted to journey along the Grand Trunk Road in a bullock cart?

Ans. The writer’s father surprisingly supported his idea of traveling by bullock cart on the Grand Trunk Road. He even called it a “splendid idea” and recounted his own adventurous travels on foot and horseback, downplaying any potential discomfort or danger.

  1. Why was it difficult for the writer to pass the last few days at Amritsar?

Ans. The writer found it difficult to pass the last few days in Amritsar because he was so strongly drawn to the beauty of the Himalayas. The “call of the Himalayas” was so powerful that it made the remaining days in Amritsar seem to drag on forever.

  1. Why did he say that his ‘eyes had no rest the livelong day’?

Ans. The writer said his “eyes had no rest the livelong day” because he was so captivated by the scenery on his journey to the Himalayas. He was constantly taking in the beauty of the terraced hillsides, waterfalls, and the towering Deodar trees.

  1. What according to him is the ‘first vision’?

Ans. According to the writer, the “first vision” refers to seeing something new and impressive for the first time. When we experience something for the first time, we appreciate it fully without thinking about all the similar experiences we might have in the future.

  1. What did he not look forward to in the mornings?

Ans. The writer did not look forward to the cold morning baths in Bakrota. The water was icy cold, and his father wouldn’t allow the servants to warm it for him.

  1. What does he say about Bakrota?

Ans. The writer describes Bakrota as being on the highest hilltop and bitterly cold, even nearing May. The winter frosts hadn’t yet melted on the shady side of the hill.

  1. Why does he call the Deodars, ‘these lordly forest trees’?

Ans. The writer calls the Deodars “these lordly forest trees” because of their immense size, towering shadows, and long lifespan. They are described as giants that have lived for centuries.

  1. Why did he have to find a shortcut to return after the walk with his father?

Ans. The writer had to find a shortcut to return after the walk with his father because his father’s pace was too fast for him to keep up with. He mentions that even many older people couldn’t keep up with his father’s walking pace.

  1. What was his father’s reaction when the writer wanted to journey along the Grand Trunk Road in a bullock cart?

Ans. The writer’s father surprisingly supported his idea of traveling by bullock cart on the Grand Trunk Road. He even called it a “splendid idea” and recounted his own adventurous travels on foot and horseback, downplaying any potential discomfort or danger.

  1. When this comes to be known to that calculating organ it promptly tries to make a saving in its expenditure of attention.
    a. What does ‘this’ refer to?
    b. What is referred to as the ‘calculating organ’?
    c. Explain in your own words: ‘saving in its own expenditure’.
  2. One day as we reached the staging bungalow, I forgot to make it over to him and left it lying on a table.
    a. What did the writer forget?
    b. Who did the thing belong to?
    c. What was the consequence of his forgetting?
  3. But this was more than flesh and blood could stand.
    a. Whose feelings are being described here?
    b. Why did he feel this way?
    c. What brought about a change in the mood?

Answers:

  1. When this comes to be known to that calculating organ it promptly tries to make a saving in its expenditure of attention.
  • a. “This” refers to the experience of seeing many similar sights repeatedly.
  • b. The “calculating organ” is a metaphorical term for the mind. It suggests that the mind tries to conserve its energy by becoming less attentive to repeated experiences.
  • c. Here, “saving in its expenditure” means the mind reduces the effort it puts into paying attention to details when it encounters similar things repeatedly.
  1. One day as we reached the staging bungalow, I forgot to make it over to him and left it lying on a table.
  • a. The writer forgot the cashbox containing a significant amount of money.
  • b. The cashbox belonged to the writer’s father.
  • c. The consequence of forgetting the cashbox was likely a reprimand from his father.
  1. But this was more than flesh and blood could stand.
  • a. The feelings are being described by the writer himself.
  • b. He felt this way because he found the morning lessons, especially after a disrupted sleep due to the long walks, to be extremely difficult and tiring.
  • c. The change in mood likely came from his father showing compassion and allowing him to stop the lessons when he felt overwhelmed.
  1. Explain: “the call of the Himalayas was so strong upon me’.
  2. Describe in your words the writer’s journey along the terraced hillsides.
  3. What is the advantage of the first vision?
  4. Why does the writer imagine himself to be a foreigner in the streets of Calcutta?
  5. Why does he think his father left his cash box with him and not with Kishori?
  6. What ritual did the father indulge in at the end of each stage?
  7. What was the morning routine of the writer and his father?
  8. How did the writer manage to drink less quantity of milk?
  9. Describe how the writer felt at the end of the mid-day meal.
  10. Explain: ‘mere acquiescence without love is empty’.
  11. What can be gathered about the father from this passage?
  12. Imagine that the father is talking to a friend where he shares how he wants
    his son to grow up. Write what he would say to his friend.
  13. Imagine that the writer now has a son of his own. He writes a letter to his father about how he wants to bring him up. Write the letter.

Answers: (2 Sets of answers are given to help students with their HWs)

  1. Explain: “the call of the Himalayas was so strong upon me”

Ans. This sentence uses figurative language to describe the writer’s intense desire to reach the Himalayas. It suggests that the mountains themselves were beckoning him, creating a powerful pull that made him impatient to be there.

  1. Describe in your words the writer’s journey along the terraced hillsides.

Ans. The writer’s journey along the terraced hillsides was likely filled with breathtaking views and vibrant colors. He describes them as “aflame with the beauty of the flowering spring crops,” suggesting a landscape bursting with life and color. Imagine traveling in a jhampan, carried uphill, with these beautiful terraced fields unfolding before you – a truly mesmerizing experience.

  1. What is the advantage of the first vision?

Ans. The advantage of the “first vision” is that it allows for a fresh and unfiltered perspective. When we encounter something for the first time, our minds are fully engaged, noticing every detail and appreciating the full impact of the experience. This initial experience creates a lasting memory.

  1. Why does the writer imagine himself to be a foreigner in the streets of Calcutta?

Ans. The writer imagines himself as a foreigner in Calcutta to force himself to pay attention to his surroundings. He believes that familiarity breeds a certain blindness, causing us to miss the details and beauty of the everyday world. By pretending to be a newcomer, he can rediscover the wonder and unique qualities of his own city.

  1. Why does he think his father left his cash box with him and not with Kishori?

Ans. The writer speculates that his father left the cash box with him to train him for responsibility. Kishori, being the attendant, was a more experienced and responsible person to handle money. However, by entrusting it to the writer, even though he was young, the father might have been trying to instill a sense of accountability and teach him how to manage finances.

  1. What ritual did the father indulge in at the end of each stage?

Ans. The passage suggests that the father performed some kind of religious devotion after reaching their destination for the day. He would sit in the “glazed verandah” with a “lighted lamp,” which could indicate prayer or meditation practices.

  1. What was the morning routine of the writer and his father?

Ans. Their morning routine involved starting with “bread and milk” after waking up. The writer would then have Sanskrit lessons followed by an astronomical discourse or stargazing with his father.

  1. How did the writer manage to drink less quantity of milk?

Ans. The writer managed to drink less milk by appealing to the servants’ kindness. Since his father didn’t allow them to add hot water, the servants, perhaps out of sympathy or “human kindness,” filled his goblet with “more than half full of foam,” reducing the amount of actual milk he had to consume.

  1. Describe how the writer felt at the end of the mid-day meal.

Ans. After the midday meal, the writer felt extremely drowsy due to the combination of a heavy meal and the disrupted sleep caused by the long morning walks. He describes it as “more than flesh and blood could stand.” This suggests a state of complete exhaustion and an overwhelming urge to sleep.

  1. Explain: ‘mere acquiescence without love is empty’.

Ans. This statement means that simply accepting something without any genuine understanding or belief is meaningless. True acceptance and growth come from internalizing the concept and appreciating its value, not just passively obeying.

  1. What can be gathered about the father from this passage?

Ans. From this passage, the father appears to be a strict yet encouraging figure. He prioritizes education, religious practices, and personal growth for his son. However, he allows the son space for independence and encourages him to explore his own interests. He doesn’t force his views or beliefs but lets the son learn through his experiences.

  1. Imagine that the father is talking to a friend where he shares how he wants his son to grow up.

Ans. “I want my son to develop a curiosity about the world and a thirst for knowledge. Exposing him to different experiences, like this trip to the Himalayas, will broaden his horizons. It’s important for him to learn discipline and responsibility, but I also want him to discover his own passions and develop his thinking independently. Yes, there will be mistakes, but through them, he can learn and grow. Most importantly, I want him to develop a love for truth and a genuine connection with his inner self.”

  1. Imagine that the writer now has a son of his own. He writes a letter to his father about how he wants to bring him up.

Ans.

Dearest Father,

Holding my son close tonight, I’m reminded of our trek in the Himalayas. You taught me independence by letting me roam free. Now, I create safe spaces for my son to explore and learn. You sparked my love of learning, and I aim to do the same with him. Most importantly, you showed me the power of seeking truth. I want to foster that curiosity in him too. Thank you for shaping me and giving me the tools to raise him with the same values.

With love,

Your Son

  1. Explain: “the call of the Himalayas was so strong upon me”.

Ans. This sentence describes the writer’s intense desire to reach the Himalayas. It suggests a powerful yearning for the beauty, adventure, and freedom he associates with the mountains. The “call” implies a near-magnetic pull that overpowers his patience for staying in Amritsar any longer.

  1. Describe in your words the writer’s journey along the terraced hillsides.

Ans. The writer’s journey along the terraced hillsides was likely a visually stunning experience. He describes the hillsides as “aflame with the beauty of the flowering spring crops,” suggesting vibrant colors and a sense of renewal. Traveling in a jhampan (palki) might have offered a unique perspective, allowing him to fully appreciate the terraced landscape.

  1. What is the advantage of the first vision?

Ans. The advantage of the “first vision” is that everything seems new, exciting, and worthy of full attention. Our minds are more engaged in taking in all the details, leading to a richer experience. However, as we encounter similar things repeatedly, the mind becomes less attentive, focusing on aspects that stand out or are deemed important.

  1. Why does the writer imagine himself to be a foreigner in the streets of Calcutta?

Ans. The writer imagines himself as a foreigner in Calcutta to force himself to see his familiar surroundings with fresh eyes. By detaching himself from the usual way he perceives his own city, he might be able to appreciate the details and complexities he might otherwise take for granted. This act allows him to rediscover the beauty and intrigue hidden in the ordinary.

  1. Why does he think his father left his cash box with him and not with Kishori?

Ans. The writer speculates that his father entrusted him with the cash box to train him for responsibility. Kishori, the attendant, was a more experienced and trustworthy person to handle money. However, the father might have wanted the writer to learn the importance of handling responsibility and understand the value of money.

  1. What ritual did the father indulge in at the end of each stage?

Ans. At the end of each stage (resting place), the father likely performed a religious ritual. He would sit on the veranda and chant the Upanishads, which are ancient Hindu scriptures.

  1. What was the morning routine of the writer and his father?

Ans. The morning routine involved the writer and his father starting their day with bread and milk. They would then embark on a long walk, with the father setting a challenging pace. After returning, the father would hold a Sanskrit declension lesson for the writer. Finally, they would perform a religious ceremony together by chanting the Upanishads.

  1. How did the writer manage to drink less quantity of milk?

Ans. The writer managed to drink less milk by relying on the kindness (or “frailty”) of the servants. He implies that they would fill his cup more than halfway with foam, reducing the amount of actual milk he had to consume.

  1. Describe how the writer felt at the end of the mid-day meal.

Ans. The writer likely felt extremely drowsy and overwhelmed after the midday meal. The combination of heavy lessons and lack of sleep due to the long walks made him exhausted. He describes this feeling as “more than flesh and blood could stand,” highlighting his struggle to stay awake.

  1. Explain: ‘mere acquiescence without love is empty’.

Ans. This statement suggests that simply accepting something without genuine understanding or belief is meaningless. It emphasizes the importance of internalizing knowledge, values, or practices rather than just passively going along with them. True comprehension and love for a concept or belief are what make it truly impactful and lasting.

  1. What can be gathered about the father from this passage?

Ans. From this passage, we can gather that the father is:

  • Strict but Encouraging: He sets high standards and expects discipline from his son, evident in the lessons and routines. However, he also allows him independence and freedom to explore.
  • Patient and Understanding: He shows patience with the writer’s forgetfulness and exhaustion, allowing him to stop lessons when overwhelmed.
  • Supportive of Individuality: He encourages the writer’s ideas, even if they differ from his own, like the bullock cart journey.
  • Religious: He follows Hindu religious practices like chanting scriptures and upholding rituals.
  • Values Knowledge and Truth: He prioritizes the writer’s education in Sanskrit, scriptures, and philosophical concepts.
  1. Imagine that the father is talking to a friend where he shares how he wants his son to grow up.

Ans. “I want my son to develop a strong foundation, both in knowledge and character. Sanskrit and the Upanishads will equip him with wisdom and a connection to our heritage. But that’s just the beginning. I dream of him venturing out, exploring the world with open eyes. It won’t always be comfortable, there will be detours, and his choices might not always align with mine. But that’s how he’ll learn and discover his own path. My role is to be a guide, not a dictator. I’ll offer support, challenge him to think critically, and be there to catch him if he stumbles. But ultimately, I want him to embrace independence, find his own passions, and forge his own unique path in life. The world is full of wonder and knowledge waiting to be unearthed, and I want him to have the courage and curiosity to seek it out.”

13. Imagine that the writer now has a son of his own. He writes a letter to his father about how he wants to bring him up.

Ans.

Dearest Father,

As I write this letter, holding my son nestled close, memories of our journey to the Dalhousie Hills come flooding back. It’s been years since we embarked on that adventure, yet the lessons you instilled in me continue to shape my approach to raising him.

I remember your unwavering commitment to my independence. You allowed me to wander freely in the mountains, trusting me to explore and learn from my experiences. It’s a philosophy I’m trying to emulate. I create safe spaces for my son to explore, encouraging him to discover his own curiosity and build confidence.

Your emphasis on education also left a lasting impression. While Sanskrit declensions might not be on his immediate curriculum, I strive to ignite a love for learning in him. We read together, explore the wonders of nature, and I answer his endless questions with patience and enthusiasm. Just like you exposed me to different perspectives, I introduce him to diverse cultures and ways of thinking.

The most impactful lesson, however, was your belief in the importance of seeking truth. You never forced me to accept things blindly. You encouraged me to question, to debate, and ultimately, to find my own convictions. This is the gift I want to give my son as well. We have open conversations, and I encourage him to express his doubts and opinions, fostering critical thinking and intellectual curiosity.

Of course, there are moments when I long for the structure and discipline you instilled. The midday drowsiness your lessons induced is a distant memory now, replaced by the delightful chaos of a toddler’s energy! Yet, I find strength in your example. You nurtured responsibility while fostering independence, a balance I strive for.

Thank you, Father, for shaping me into the man I am today, and for giving me the tools to raise my own son with the same values of exploration, learning, and the pursuit of truth.

With love and gratitude,

Your Son

Vocabulary

  • 1. my thirsting heart
  • 2. fittest custodian
  • 3. immense lives
  • 4. shimmering dimly in the starlight
  • 5. appointed hour
  • 6. caressing warmth
  • 7. grievously wanting

Answers:

  1. My thirsting heart: This phrase expresses a deep longing.
  • Sentence: After years of living in the city, Maya felt a thirsting heart for the peace and quiet of the countryside.
  1. Fittest custodian: This refers to the most suitable person to be entrusted with something.
  • Sentence: The king declared his eldest son the fittest custodian of the royal treasury.
  1. Immense lives: This describes something that has lived for a very long time.
  • Sentence: The towering redwood trees stood as silent witnesses to history, their immense lives spanning centuries.
  1. Shimmering dimly in the starlight: This paints a picture of something faintly glowing in the darkness.
  • Sentence: Fireflies shimmered dimly in the starlight, creating a magical scene in the summer night.
  1. Appointed hour: This refers to a specific time set aside for something.
  • Sentence: My dentist appointment is at 3 pm, so I need to leave work early.
  1. Caressing warmth: This describes a feeling of comfort and gentleness.
  • Sentence: The cat curled up in my lap, its purring a caressing warmth that soothed my anxieties.
  1. Grievously wanting: This means something is lacking or insufficient in a significant way.
  • Sentence: Despite her best efforts, Sarah’s new business venture was grievously wanting in customers.

Ans.

IdiomMeaning
1. Bark up the wrong treec. To look for something in the wrong place
2. The ball is in your courth. It’s up to you to make the next move
3. Wouldn’t be caught deadg. Would not like to be in a particular situation
4. Steal someone’s thundera. To take credit for something done by someone else
5. See eye to eyef. To agree with someone
6. Let the cat out of the bagd. To share information that was hidden earlier
7. Miss the boate. Miss the opportunity
8. Jump on the bandwagonb. Join a popular activity
  1. The salesman was barking up the wrong tree trying to sell me a sports car, knowing I only drive fuel-efficient vehicles.
  2. The manager told the team the ball is in their court to decide how to proceed with the project.
  3. I wouldn’t be caught dead wearing those ripped jeans to a job interview.
  4. When Sarah won the award, her jealous colleague tried to steal her thunder by bragging about how much they helped her.
  5. My parents and I don’t always see eye to eye on curfews, but we’re working on finding a compromise.
  6. During the surprise party, someone accidentally let the cat out of the bag, ruining the whole thing!
  7. John missed the boat on investing in that company before it went public.
  8. Seeing how popular the new fitness class is, I decided to jump on the bandwagon and give it a try.

Grammar

1. The books we bought …………. in the classroom.

2. The woman who is standing under that tree …………. my aunt.

3. Dolly and Girish …………. playing the piano.

4. The boys …………. coming back home in the afternoon.

5. The teachers …………. being awarded today.

Answers:

  1. The books we bought are in the classroom. (are – plural verb agrees with “books”)
  2. The woman who is standing under that tree is my aunt. (is – singular verb agrees with “woman”)
  3. Dolly and Girish are playing the piano. (are – plural verb agrees with “Dolly and Girish”)
  4. The boys are coming back home in the afternoon. (are – plural verb agrees with “boys”)
  5. The teachers are being awarded today. (are being awarded – passive voice, present continuous tense for a planned event)

1. Neither the cat nor the rat …………. apples. (to eat)

2. Neither Mr Mehta nor his wife …………. (to plan) to attend the meeting.

3. Either Garfield or his friend …………. (to cook) dinner every evening.

4. Neither my mother nor my father …………. (to want) to go home early.

5. Neither this argument nor that ……….sense. (to make)

Answers:

  1. Neither the cat nor the rat eats apples. (eat – singular verb agrees with “neither”)
  2. Neither Mr Mehta nor his wife plans (to attend) the meeting. (plans – singular verb agrees with “neither” even though there are two people)
  3. Either Garfield or his friend cooks dinner every evening. (cooks – singular verb agrees with whoever is doing the cooking)
  4. Neither my mother nor my father wants to go home early. (wants – singular verb agrees with “neither”)
  5. Neither this argument nor that makes sense. (makes – singular verb agrees with “neither”)

1. Every parent and guardian …………. PTA meeting. asked to come to the

2. Neither Malini nor Meenal …………. responsible for what happened.

3. The selection committee …………. divided in their opinion.

4. The furniture …………. imported from the USA.

5. Rupees fifty ……… too much for a plate of rice.

6. A number of students …………. opted to study Sanskrit.

7. The Indian team …………. all out for 200 runs.

8. The police …………. under control. arrived and the situation will soon be

9. One of the children …………. not had lunch.

10. There …………. two possible answers to this question.

Answers:

  1. Every parent and guardian has been asked to come to the PTA meeting. (has been – passive voice, past tense, agrees with “neither”)
  2. Neither Malini nor Meenal is responsible for what happened. (is – singular verb agrees with “neither”)
  3. The selection committee is divided in their opinion. (is – present tense)
  4. The furniture is imported from the USA. (is – present tense for a general fact)
  5. Rupees fifty is too much for a plate of rice. (is – singular subject “rupees”)
  6. A number of students have opted to study Sanskrit. (have – plural subject “students,” present perfect tense)
  7. The Indian team was all out for 200 runs. (was – past tense)
  8. The police have arrived and the situation will soon be under control. (have arrived – present perfect tense to show a completed action)
  9. One of the children has not had lunch. (has not had – negative present perfect tense)
  10. There are two possible answers to this question. (are – plural verb agrees with “answers”)

When I ………. (to be) little, I loved to go outdoors and play. Even if the Sun ………. (shine) hot and bright, I ………. (want) to go out. Mother would stop me from ………. (go), but I did not listen.
One day, I ………. (play) all by myself in the garden outside when I ………. (hear) some sound in the bushes. At first, I did not pay any attention, but the sound ………. (persist). I ………. (stop) my play and ………. (walk) cautiously towards the bush. My eyes ………. (search) for some movement, but I could see nothing.
Suddenly, the back door ………. (open) and my mother ………. (call out), ‘Rohan, what ………. (to be) you ………. (do) there all alone? Come in at once! You ………. (fall) sick if you ………. (play) in the hot Sun.’
I ………. (turn) around to look at her and at the same time she screamed, ‘Run to me, quick! There ………. (to be) a huge snake in that bush!!
I ran for my life, but as I ………. (run) towards, I ………. (trip) and ………. (fall). Scrambling quickly to my feet, I lunged towards Mom and she ………. (bang) the mesh door shut.
Thank God you ………. (to be) safe. From now on, you (listen) to what I say. No more playing alone in the garden, you hear me?’
I ………. (sit) in a park now ………. (watch) my son play. I still like to be outdoors. But I ……….never ………. (forget) that hot afternoon when I almost got bitten by a snake.

Answers:

When I was (be) little, I loved to go outdoors and play. Even if the Sun shone (shine) hot and bright, I wanted (want) to go out. Mother would stop (stop) me from going (go), but I didn’t listen (not listen).

One day, I was playing (play) all by myself in the garden outside when I heard (hear) some sound in the bushes. At first, I didn’t pay (not pay) any attention, but the sound persisted (persist). I stopped (stop) my play and walked (walk) cautiously towards the bush. My eyes searched (search) for some movement, but I could see nothing (not see).

Suddenly, the back door opened (open) and my mother called out (call out), “Rohan, what are (be) you doing (do) there all alone? Come in at once! You will fall (fall) sick if you play (play) in the hot Sun.”

I turned (turn) around to look at her and at the same time she screamed, “Run to me, quick! There is (be) a huge snake in that bush!”

I ran (run) for my life, but as I ran (run) towards her, I tripped (trip) and fell (fall). Scrambling quickly to my feet, I lunged (lunge) towards Mom and she banged (bang) the mesh door shut.

“Thank God you are (be) safe. From now on, you will listen (listen) to what I say. No more playing alone in the garden, you hear me?”

I sit (sit) in a park now, watching (watch) my son play. I still like (like) to be outdoors. But I will never forget (never forget) that hot afternoon when I almost got bitten by a snake.


This Post Has 3 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    Very long answers.
    Nonsupportive.

  2. Anonymous

    Very very much helpful ☺️

  3. Lfcs

    Thnx

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